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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 152 (some duplicates have been removed)
. ♪ ♪ >> bob: listen, this is really important. according to a recent study, religion is dying in america. number of americans who don't affiliate themselves with any religion is all-time high. one in five adults according to pew center on religion. there are, brian, one in five people say they don't affiliate at all with a religion, that is way up. among people under 30 it's higher than that. is that a trend you think will continue? >> brian: i am not smart enough to answer that. i am fascinated with the fact that people are fascinated with religion and god. i look at this, evidence for real is a book in the top ten best seller, top 13 now. two years. this kid who transformed -- >> bob: i read several times. >> brian: cover of "newsweek" "is especially real?" they do a study with neurologist that died and came back. >> andrea: i thought it was the left god, barack obama? >> brian: i don't think so. our god. >> bob: can we have one segment we don't do that? please. it's my segment. i want to talk about religion. >> brian: a lot of people, a lot of people question their religion. but the c
observer of american politics, and culture, and also a thoughtful skull on issues of religion and culture and politics, and a seasoned observer of arab politics and with these two gentlemen as our assistance today, we will be able to take a broader look at how the arab world are looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so i'm grateful to all of you for coming. i look forward to our discussion. and at this point i'd like to invite shibley telhami up to the podium to present. >> thanks a lot, tammy. it's only good to be here. i'm going to just present, not the whole thing by some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation, i will present the highlights but i just want to give you a bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks, 700, sample, 737, that is designed to be national representative. it's an internet panel. the methodologies described in the information that will put out is also available online. i also
scholars on issues of religion and culture and politics. and the washington bureau chief, a seasoned observer of our politics. with these two gentlemen at our assistance today, we will take a broader look at how the arab world is looking at the united states in the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and fast-changing environment. i am grateful to all of you for coming. i look forward to our discussions. i like to invite him up to the podium to present the poll. >> thank you. it is always good to be here. i am going to present not the whole thing but some of the findings we can get on with. i want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by a number of networks that is designed to be a national representative of an international panel. the methodologies described in the information that will be put out is also available online. i want to say it is my pleasure and honor to partner this program, a program for international policy attitudes, particularly my colleague. he has a recen
, the religion news writers association examines religious freedom and the first amendment. >> our campaign 2012 debate hubble web site provides live and on-demand coverage of all the presidential and vice presidential debates, and it is the only place you will see behind the scenes coverage, before and after the debates. the site has the debate question available who has a separate court. watch your creative clips and read streaming tweets from political reporters along with your questions. >> no, in montana care -- in montana, one of the closest senate races of the country. it is rated a toss up. this debate is courtesy of montana pbs. it is 90 minutes. >> here's tonight's moderator, steve prosinski. >> good evening and welcome to tonight's u.s. senate debate by billings gazette communication. i'm steve prosinski, editor of the gazette. many thanks to the chancellor, director of university relations, and many others, for providing a perfect venue for this exchange of opinions and ideasbetween denny rehberg and senator john tester a democrat. three veteran montana voters -- reporters will ask q
such as this. i would like to ask you both to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. please talk about how you came to that decision. talking about how your religion played a part in that. this is such an emotional issue for so many in this country. please talk personally about this if you could. >> i do not see how a person can separate their personal life from their public life and their faith. our faith informs us and everything we do. it informs me of how to make sure people have a chance in life. if you want to ask why i am pro-life, it is not simply because of my catholic faith. that is a factor of course. it is also because of reason and science. i think about 10 and a half years ago, my wife jan and i went to mercy hospital where i was born for our seventh week ultrasound for our firstborn child. we saw the heartbeat. our little baby was in the shape of the been. to this day, we have nicknamed our firstborn child "bean." i believe life begins at conception. those are the reasons i am pro- life. i understand this is a difficult issue. i respe
worldwide providing an intersectional analysis of the ways race, class, sex alty, religion combine with gender to affect women's lives. today this committee is actively involved in the magazine in a number of ways. we suggestion topics for the magazine. we review books, we recruit experts to write for "ms.." and through a foundation grant "ms." sponsored writing work shops to train particularly women study scholars in various media platforms. and i remember one of those meetings where there were the older generation of us and the younger generation of us. and the older generation was i don't know why i need to be on northbound and the younger people were saying this is the way you communicate with your friends. and eleanor smeal said you all have got to get with it. so she brought us kicking and screaming into the 21st century and the magazine has stayed in the forefront of that. in addition, not only are we as scholars there working with the magazine but we're bringing the magazine into the class rooms for our students. "ms." has this wonderful classroom program. and "ms." has alw
your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. please talk about how you came to that decision. talking about how your religion played a part in that. this is such an emotional issue for so many in this country. please talk personally about this if he could. -- if you could. >> i do not see how a person can separate their personal life from their public life and their faith. our faith informs us and everything we do. it informs me of how to make sure people have a chance in life. if you want to ask why i am pro- life, it is not simply because of my catholic faith. that is a factor of course. it is also because of reason and science. i think about 10 and a half years ago, my wife jan and i went to mercy hospital where i was born for our seventh week ultrasound for our firstborn child. we saw the heartbeat. our little baby was in the shape of the been. to this day, we have nicknamed our firstborn child "bean." i believe life begins at conception. those are the reasons i am pro- life. i understand this is a difficult issue. i respect people who do not agree with m
. according to all profits and all religions and faiths, it's forbidden and it's a very ugly behavior. how can you, in order to obtain four or five additional votes or to make a party more popular than the other -- allow me, sir. allow me. >> do you believe that homosexual people, are they born homosexual or do they become homosexual? what do you believe? >> they become at the end of the day, they do become that way. you see the problems that are facing humanity today are much different than whether a single woman goes skiing or not. there are many reforms yet to take place. many reforms as to be realized. is america a poor country? they are human beings, too. each one of them is a complete human being with many hopes and aspirations and dreams. throughout the world, 1.2 billion people live in utter poverty. dictatorships exists, and denying human dignity exists, unfortunately, and all of it must be reformed. >> when i hear this, i like you speaking like this, this is great, but shouldn't freedom and individuality and all those things also extend to people who just happen to be gay, and they w
don't believe that it's ever been a belief in religion. this is what i'm going to say that the christian part of barack obama's history made him did not have. another save you some of them. i believe he's christian. i have been to his church and i believe that is what he believes in. as christian and i converted to islam because i felt for women it is more protected because of their traditional role of father and mother in the home with her mother was allowed to be at home and have children with protection of the father. i thought i was a positive situation for me. it takes women off welfare and we don't have that game situation in prison situation that we would have here. but israel, i don't think we should follow their lead because i think the world looks at how americans get along with each other, not how israel gets along with america. israel's approach and the religion is an eye for an eye. they do not follow the christian approach. so when things happen to them in the international war, i feel that followed i for an eye and american doesn't follow that actually t
is the congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or the free exercise and stay out of it and leave people alone when it comes to their religion obviously assumes the religion. they believe in god. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a unde
what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion? please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how religion played a role. and please talk personally about this, if you could. congressman ryan. >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life. my faith informs me how to take care of the vulnerable, how to make sure that people have a chance in life. you ask me why i'm pro life? it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course, but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about 10 1/2 years ago, my wife jan and i went to mercy hospital in janesville, where i was born, for our seven-week ultrasound for our first born child. we saw that heartbeat, our little baby was in the shape of a bean. and to this day, we have nicknamed our first born child, l liza, bean. i believe life begins at concept, those are the reasons why i'm pro life. now, i understand this is a difficult issue and i respect people who don't agree with me on this. but the policy of a romney administration wi
on the stage. i would like to ask you both what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. talk about how you came to that decision and how your religion played a part in that. this is such and emotional issue for some many people. please talk personally if you could. congressman ryan. >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life for their faith. our faith informs us of everything we do. how to take care of the vulnerable, to make sure people have a chance in life. you ask why a pr mo-life -- i am pro-life. it is not simply because of my catholic faith. it is because of reason and science. i think of 10 1/2 years ago, my wife and i went to mercy hospital where i was born for our seven-week ultrasound for our firstborn child. we saw that heartbeat. our baby was in the shape of a bean. we have nicknamed our child "bean." i believe life begins at conception. i understand this is a difficult issue and i respect people that don't agree with me on this. but the policy of our administration will be to oppose abortion with the exce
on a stage such as this. and i would like to ask you both to tell me what role your religion has played in your own personal views on abortion. please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about howe your religion played a part in that. and this is such an emotion amish you for so many people in this country, please talk personally about this if you could. congressman ryan. >> ryan: i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. how to take care of the vulnerable and how to make sure that people have a choice in life. i'm pro life and that's not simply because of my catholic faith. but it's always because of reason and science. i think about 10 1/2 years ago my wife and i went to mercy hospital in janesville where i was born for our seven-week ultra sound for our first child. and we saw that heart beat. our little baby was in the shape of a bean and to this day, we have nicknamed our first child bean. i believe life begins at conception. i understand this is a
support capital holding rather than human values. according to all prophets and all religions and faith homosexuality is strictly forbidden. it's a very ugly behavior. how can you in order to obtain four or five additional votes or make a party more popular than the other how can you. allow me. >> do you believe that homosexual people, are they born homosexual or do they become homosexual? what do you believe? >> translator: they become. at the end of the day they do become that way. i'm not seeing any root causes of it. the problems that are facing humanity today are much deeper than whether a single lady goes skiing or not. there are many reforms to take place, many reforms. in the united states 50 million people live in poverty. the ameriis america a poor coun? they are human beings to do. they have many hopes and aspirations. 1.2 billion people live in utter poverty. dictatorships do exist. denying human dignity exists. all of this must be reformed. >> when i hear you -- >> translator: allow you. >> i like you speaking like this. this is great. shouldn't freedom and individuality an
% last year. including the olive garden and p.f. chang's. it's like an emerging religion. some churches now offer gluten free commonon wafers. this is a business. >> why you eating gluten free? >> because she's eating. >> what is gluten. >> wheat i think? >> right. gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. so it's in baked goods and cereals, but because it acts as a sticky binding agent, it's also in soups, gravy, sauces, salad dressings, even hot dogs and ketchup. but some people just can't digest gluten. if they eat it, they'll get sick. about 1% of americans have skeel yak disease, guaranteeing that gluten in their diet carries with it pain, discomfort, sometimes even rashes or joint pain. what's interesting is that there aren't nearly enough people who have medical problems with gluten to explain the giant surge in gluten-free products. >> we now have over 300 gluten free products. >> dom is a marketing manager for general mills. >> they range from fruit snacks and yoplait yogurt, progresso soups all the way to our chex favors as well as bet ewe crocker and business quick
, on a stage such as this. and i would like to ask you both to tell me what role your religion has played in yourview. please talk about how you came to that decision. talk about how your religion played a part in that and please, this is such an emotional issue for so many people in this country, please talk personally about this, if you could. congressman ryan? >> i don't see how a person can separate their public life from their private life or from their faith. our faith informs us in everything we do. my faith informs me about how to take care of the you have they arable. of how to make sure that people have a chance in life. now, you want to ask basically why i'm pro-life, it's not simply because of my catholic faith. that's a factor, of course. but it's also because of reason and science. you know, i think about ten and a half years ago, my wife janna and i went to mercy hospital where i was born for our seven-week ultrasound for our first born child and we saw that heartbeat. our little baby was in the shape of a bean. and to this day, we have nicknamed our first born child, liza,
garden and p.f. chang's. it's like an emerging religion. some churches now offer gluten-free communion wafers. this is no longer a fad. it's a business. >> why are you eating gluten-free? >> because she's eating it. >> okay. >> what is gluten? >> some kind of wheat. >> gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, so it's in baked goods and cereals, but because it acts as a sticky binding agent, it's also in soups, gravies, sauces, salad dressings, even hot dogs and ketchup. but some people just can't digest gluten. if they eat it, they'll get sick. about 1% of americans have ciliak disease, coming with rashes or joint pain. what's interesting is that there aren't nearly enough people who have medical problems with gluten to explain the giant surge in gluten-free products. >> we know have over 300 gluten-free products. >> don is a marketing manager for general mills. >> ranging from yogurt, progressive soups, all the way to our chex flavors as well as betty crocker. >> is there any scientific proof that if you're not part of that extremely small minority of americans who are sen
over football and religion. a judge has to decide whether cheerleaders can use religious messages during games. >>> and with more how the controversy is playing out. >> reporter: good morning. the game was the first since a judge heard arguments about whether the cheerleaders must stop using biblical messages. around here religion and high school football are two things people are passionate about. friday night under the lights in texas with the band, the fans, the players and something different, a banner with a christian message written by the school's cheerleaders. >> we thought it would be a great message. >> reporter: that message is at the center of a legal battle. the school superintendent banned the religious themed banners last month when it was claimed they violated the separation of church and state. the judge allowed the practice to continue until he rules and last night there were more religious signs than ever before. and friends and family who say the cheerleaders messages on the banners are free speech. >> both the united states constitution and the texas constitut
, the largest muslim population. is that more of a question of religion or geography or when you talk about geography you're talking about religion? >> it's about technology creating new geographical communities where you can have a pan islam. my previous book was about the indian ocean. >> rose: "monsoon" as i remember. >> right and the islam in southeast asia is very diffeent --. >> rose: you talk to them and that's what they tell you. >> but because of technology muslims from one part of the greater middle east to the other part and to the muslim community in southeast asia can now interact with each other and rediscover their faith as a unit rather than a separate groups. so it creates a new geography of islam. it's still about space so each place interacts with every other so in ordeto dersnd iyou have to understand the connections and disaggregate it and understand that people become engaged about who owns the mountains in kashmir. best example is india and china. india and china, two gate civilizations, developed completely separated divided by the high wall of the himalayas. now ind
, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the soul would use a "you bought that?" walter cronkite and journalism today, sunday at 8:00 on "q &a." >>
of first amendment and government will not impede or endorse practice of religion. where do you see the conflict going. >> it isitutional. what the court said repeatedly what matters is history and context. look at the history of this memorial. it was erected in 1929 to honor 49 men who gave their lives in prince george cone. it would be a travity if it had to be moved or torn down. >> so at this point though, the fact that the other side is arguing that it does infringe on the first amendment, how do you respond to that? >> well, the supreme court said in the 10 commandment's case what matters is history and context. here we have history. purpose of this is honoring the veterans . also we have context. it doesn't sit alone. it sits with other moniments. there is a memor to korean and vietnam veterans. it is where a battle was in the 1812. and so the supreme court would say and that this is constitutional. we can't disrespect our veterans by second guessing what they chose. >> and you disagree as i understand it. >> no disrespect is intended. i think we should have a secular war mem
than the politics, religion, sexual preference, something that goes to the very soul. you bought that? it is remarkable. >> do you still paint? >> not enough. it is one of the things i keep -- i have space to do it at home. i have all the materials to do it, but i am lacking the focus of being able to separate my work from my other life. that is one area in which i am weakest. >> if we saw you in your personal life, doing things that you enjoy more than anything else, what would we see? >> well, there are two kinds of enjoyment. there is the tortured kind, writing, but there is no greater kick, i find, than writing something, and no greater torture at the same time. it would be writing something or drawing and painting. >> what can you tell us about your wife? where did you meet her? >> i met her when i was london bureau chief. i remember the day, july 4, 1968. cronkite and betsy, walter and a betsy cronkite were coming to london. i cannot remember why. i had been invited to a july 4 evening. a friend of mine, the husband was american, the wife was british. the fellow -- walter had ca
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 152 (some duplicates have been removed)